January 22, 2018

 Downward Facing Dog, "Adho Mukha Svanasana"

Downward Facing Dog, "Adho Mukha Svanasana"

 

Revolved Half Moon  
“Parvritta Ardha Chandrasana"


“We usually don’t look, we overlook.”
~ Alan Watts


Dear Yogis and Yoginis,
 

Yes! This is such a wonderful reminder for us to pay attention to what is right in front of us. Yoga teaches us to simplify so we can see what is already there and available. To want what we already have. To feel the breath in each moment like we have never felt it before. The practice of Yoga is to see the union of all things in each moment. The teacher will appear right in front of you and show up in all different shapes and sizes and colors. Yoga is not easy but it is not complicated, even when we break down the harder more challenging poses, they’re just stages leading into the next stage and variation. Build a relationship with each stage, build a relationship with you. And then take your next move from there.

These are metaphors for your life. But we like to complicate our lives and even our practice. We tend to over try or overlook and miss the gift of magic found in the mundane. We sometimes override our own systems and push to an ideal or perfection that is not attainable in the given moment. We can get burnt out easily if we override our own bodies intuition. And our bodies are so amazing in getting our attention to stop and slow down. It is a present living organism and hears everything you’re saying to yourself. The most advanced Yogis know when to back off. It takes great wisdom to back off, to take inventory and then to act from there. 

I learn something new from this pose every time I get into it. It’s awkward and uneasy and highly dynamic, and many things are going on at once! This type of pose offers the greatest teachings. Dial it back. If you push, you’ll fall over. If you judge yourself for not being perfect in it you’ll feel heavy and frustrated. Pick one thing and focus on that! Build from there. Start with your thoughts. Think about rewiring the non-physical part of you by up grading your conscious awareness to the highest most possible thought in the moment. You might laugh at first and fall over but your lightness with bring you back with a smile. When we’re out of our comfort zone we tense up. We’re afraid of being noticed. We are afraid of failing. But you can’t fail! It is not possible. It’s your smaller self that sees you as imperfect. It’s your higher Self that sees (I’m) perfect!

Alignment:

Keep your hips squared off with both feet down on the ground, all ten toes facing forward. Rotate from the bottom of your rib cage and twist medially, against the body. Open the arms apart and pull fingers tips away from finger tips. Chin is soft and neutral, maybe look toward the top hand. Shift your weight forward and bring your back leg up parallel to the floor. Press thru the back heal and reach through the crown of your head. Use the positive polarity of reaching back with the back heal and pressing forward thru the crown of your head to keep length in your spine, Lengthen the rib cage on the inhale and sustain the length on the exhale. Stay for 5 or 10 breaths.

Modifications:

Use a block under the bottom hand or lower the back foot to the floor. More advanced practices include bending the lifted leg and holding for the foot while bringing your bottom hand to your heart in half prayer.

 

Shantih Namaste,

Edwina and the peacebank family

 

January 23, 2018

 Revolved Downward Dog

Revolved Downward Dog

Revolved Downward Dog  
“Camatkarasana"


“There is no medium between you and the sun, the seen or the unseen condition of Life. Understanding alone results in a visceral feeling of peace and power that requires no additional proof or experiential affirmation. It is a certainty.” ~ Mark Whitwell


Dear Peacebank makers,

You are already truth. You are already divinity, exactly as you are. Yoga is to be done in the natural state. The state where our polarities of male and female, spirit and flesh, the seen and unseen, Heaven and Earth are already united. Yoga is not a search for the divine as if it were absent. Camatkarasana challenges our edge of comfort. It teaches us to look where we’re going. Don’t take your gaze off your drishti. Letting ourselves feel safe enough to be vulnerable takes courage and trust. This pose encourages us to feel and move from the heart center. The discerning heart. The heart that knows when to back off or to move deeper in the direction we’re headed. Not the flippy floppy heart but the heart that knows what is right for you and considers all aspects involved. “Your heart is the culminating place of the whole body and the source of the mind.” (Mark Whitwell). 

Camatkarasana is a heart opener and an Up! (back) bend. It is UP, not back that we maneuver to flip mind over body. To think ‘UP’ helps us use gravity to get higher and lighter through the transition. Concentrating on the points of contact that are to the floor and to use the standing arm and foot to push away in order to lift the heart up. I am deeply humbled with the ever furthering potential found in getting in and out of this pose gracefully. The first few years of trusting to flip my downward dog, I felt clunky and unsure and certainly ungraceful. But, I knew the environment was safe to practice falling. Risking and failing became fun. It showed there was more to learn about what it means to be in relationship with myself in each moment. Through a dedicated practice and repetition I eventually learned to slow my momentum, to pause through the matrix of the transition. To trust the pose. To trust myself. To be able to pause in action and to use the technique of stillness, we slow our reactive self and get the opportunity to choose center line, our non-polarized Self. In yoga we face our blind spots, our vasanas, our tendencies and habits and with courage we begin the repatterining of our thinking. This is the secret to freedom, to extend the space between stimulus and response.  

Alignment:

Begin in downward dog and raise a leg up and back, stack the hips and peek under the opposite arm of the leg that’s up to see the toes. Lift your standing heel high and point your toes over head toward the opposite hand as if you were going to touch the top of your hand with the foot you are flipping over with. Squeeze your seat to extend your low back. Synergize your low belly towards the small of your back so you don’t dump your weight into your low back when you flip over. Take it slow. Eventually land the toes to the floor, keep your heel lifted and shift your weight over the standing arm. Lift your sternum bone upward! Take your gaze towards your extended fingertips. Modifications include staying in 3 legged downward dog and/or bending your knees a lot before transitioning.
 

Shantih Namaste,

Edwina and the peacebank family

wild_thing_2.jpg
 

January 24, 2018

pigeon_1.jpg

Pigeon
“Eka Pada Rajakapotasana"

“Most of our brains activity is spent on primitive processes that we can’t even perceive consciously, instead we are aware of only a thin, newly evolved layer of cognition that sits on and depends on the reliable workings of older processes.” ~ T Zake


Good day Light Beings,

We have a body but we are not just our body, we have thoughts but we not just our thoughts, we have emotions and preferences but we not just those things. Yoga is the art of letting go so you can begin to receive a deeper sense of Self and disentangle the ties around what keeps you small. Feel your breath right now. Find your center, where everything aligns from within and feel your Omnipresent Self. The part of you that is all of everything else. This is genuine Self reliance, free from the influential push and pull of this very human life. To look in rather than out for the answers. Your truth is your breath. It is the greatest resource of energy that you have to help draw another part of your awareness forward. Inhale let. … Exhale go… Inhale let… Exhale love…We are here to wake up spiritually and physically to our birthright potential. You are only a victim to your lack of self love and self consideration. Life created you just as you are. And it loves you just as you are. You are always loved by the infinite presence that created you. 

Pigeon is a pose that you don’t need to do a lot to feel something. It’s a pose that talks back. It’s a pose that I have both cried and laughed in. It is where I find relief from my pushy self. Surrounding over and over and over again! What we don’t know or understand is an understatement. You must see that the authentic you doesn’t conform to stories.The real you has tremendous potential that is just waiting to be tapped. When you love yourself, you give yourself permission to be different than the person you’ve been; you can see beyond the negative stories and recognize that you’re more than just the sum of your previous choices and outcomes. Self love gives you the opportunity to start fresh, to let go of whatever ambivalence you’ve been carrying and to pursue your goals with greater clarity, purpose and determination.
 

Alignment and Modifications:

Start in Downdog or table top. Bring your knee towards the same wrist and lower your hip and thigh. Nudge your foot forward and toward the front seam of your mat. Place a blanket under you pigeon hip if it not grounded, If your knee feels vulnerable or agitated then lay on your back and thread the needle with a foot across the opposite knee and thigh. Interlace your fingers behind the back of the thigh or top of the shin. If you are in pigeon face down start to walk your hands out on an exhale and eventually bring your forearms down. Pause. Lower all the way down if your hips allows. Relax your jaw and breathe with love. 

Shantih Namaste,

Edwina and the peacebank family

 Eka Pada Rajakapotasana

Eka Pada Rajakapotasana

January 25, 2012

 Sirsasana, Headstand

Sirsasana, Headstand

Headstand
“Sirsasana"

“God is great and compassionate, but if you plant barley, don’t expect a harvest of wheat.” ~ Rumi

Namaste Bright Beings!

People who have a higher vibration often feel lighter, open, stable and loving, while feelings of heaviness, denseness, darkness, and fear are found in the lower vibration zone. Fear keeps us from feeling and simply being in our Light and pure uninhibited Self. Fear is False Evidence Appearing Real. At some point in each person’s expansion and self-awareness, there is a time to turn away from the broken and failing system of control and domination, which is also known as “The Matrix”. 

Sirsasana is the father pose of all asana. It is suggested that if you are going to do any pose, this is the one! It may take many years and even a life time or several lifetimes to hold this pose with ease and support for more than a minute but every attempt is feeding the depths of an active proficiency to enjoy one of the most important poses of your asana practice. Headstand is an introverted inversion, this pose relaxes the central nervous system and helps dissolve worry, doubt and any mental confusion from your artificial mind. Flipping your world upside down helps us get a new perspective on life. Seeing beyond our patterns and old imprinting.

The Sahasrara, 7th chakra is our immediate connect to the divine, the highest state of feeling at one with the great Spirit and teacher of all teachers. Headstand gives us a glimpse of how thin the veil really is between the seen and the unseen, between spirit and matter. Physically, headstand stimulate the cerebral spinal fluid and keeps the disease fighting capabilities of your lymphatic system healthy and vibrant. This pose stimulates the pineal gland, the birthing gland that secrets melatonin and our remembrance to Source itself. When we flush and detoxify any old vibrational memory from the legs to our head we create a potential positive outlook and raised vibration to a higher state of conscious awareness. Not to mention, an improved circulation occurs in the body with more blood being pumped to the heart and brain. The heart constantly has to pump blood upward to the brain and headstand gives the heart a rest and reduces unnecessary strain. When practiced correctly, there is weightlessness in the body. You have no where to be but in your center line. Practice practice practice and then practice some more…

Adaptations:

Come to hands and knees. Interlace your fingers and hold a fist while pressing the floor away with your forearms. Be sure to keep your elbows within your shoulder width, not any wider. Lift the hips and knees and thighs and come into dolphin to build some strength and feel of the shoulders and upper body mechanics that will sustain you in headstand. Lower your knees back to the floor. Proceed to bring your top of the head to the floor and keep pushing the floor away with your forearms while depressing your shoulders down the back and up from the floor, away from your ear lobes. Lift your knees and thighs and walk your toes in towards your elbows raising your hips more over the shoulders. Bring a knee tightly into the belly and then the other. Come into a tight cocoon and egg shell shape and hold it. As your feeling stable, begin to lengthen the legs towards the ceiling and engage your navel towards the spine. Squeeze and lift your inner thighs as you activate your toes skyward. Hold for however long as you can and proceed out of it like you got into it. More advanced practitioners will extend their arms out and then up along the legs, balancing solely on their head.

Modificatons:

Legs up the wall with cushion under your low back. Or a block under the sacrum bone and top flesh of your seat with your legs suspended in the air on your mat. Rabbit pose, a tight balasana, with your hands around your heels and the top of your head to the floor with your hips lifting up from the heels. You can also take this Rabbit set up and lift your knees coming into a downward dog shape withe the legs. A supported option is performing Sirsasana against a wall. Bring the knuckles of the clasped hands to the wall. If possible, do the pose in the corner of a room, so that the right-angled walls touch your shoulders, hips, and outer heels. No kicking up.

Contraindications and Cautions:

Back injury and chronic headaches. Heart conditions and high blood pressure. Any neck issues or injuries. If women are on their moon cycle avoid this pose during the first 3 days and take on any of the modified options. If you are pregnant and had a preexisting headstand practice go for it while taking precaution and practicing near the wall since your weight distribution is altered.

Shantih Shantih Shantih

I’m honored to be on this journey with you,

Edwina and the peacebank family

 Legs up the Wall

Legs up the Wall

 Dolphin

Dolphin

January 26, 2012

 Crow, Bakasana

Crow, Bakasana

Crow
“Bakasana"


“The truth will set you free, but first it will piss you off.” 
-Joe Klaas

My goal is to inspire students to embody their genuine and individual power. I care about how each person is doing and want them to know that a struggle without purpose is not worth it. We need the struggle because it has to potential to help us reach a higher purpose. Igniting this process within your own being is a delicate balance between your own participation and the struggle that you face. Maybe some you are striving to find your own voice, to become better at asking for what you need. Another possibility is maybe you are working on establishing better boundaries with other people. Or maybe you are searching to find physical power in your physical or spiritual body.
 
The struggle, more often than not, may include an irritated reaction slightly before and/or right after finding your own power, which always amazes me.
 
Here is an example:
 
Once I had a student ask me why she couldn't do crow pose. Upon further discussion, she told me she believed she needed to improve her strength in order to get into the pose.  I let her know that in my opinion, having enough strength wasn't the barrier for her to reach crow pose.  Well, can you guess how this story goes? She became upset, almost furious with me.  After her anger subsided she skeptically said, "Okay, I'll try, even though I don't think it will work." With verbal cues and some guidance, it did not take her long before she was successfully in crow pose. After she held the pose, she slowly landed on her feet and began to cry. Her long standing belief system of "I can't do that" changed into what was possible.

Emotions such as anger and frustration can be useful if their nature is to serve a higher purpose of understanding. Emotions can force us to move past a part of our life or self that can be stagnant; perhaps prompting us to end a friendship, relationship or job that is no longer needed for our growth. These emotions can be very useful and might possibly catapult you into an asana you never imagined yourself doing!
 
Coming into Crow pose:
 
Before you begin,  if you are afraid of falling, place a big pillow or blanket in front of your hands and where your head would be hovering.  
 
1. Come into a squat position.
2. Place both hands on the ground in front of you, about shoulder width apart.
3. Begin to place your knees on the back of your triceps or plug the knees into the arm pits as you shift your weight on the front part of your feet.
4. Begin to lift your hips and shift your weight on your hands.  
5. As the above is happing you are contracting your abdominal muscles, hugging the naval to the spine, rounding your back and creating an active engagement in the inner thighs by squeezing the legs together.
6. Lift the head and maintain a fixed gaze forward as you prepare to balance.
7. Begin to lift one foot, then the other off the ground as you lean forward and lift the hips higher. 
8. To exit the pose replace your feet on the ground.
 
*Tip*    The higher the hips go, the more you active your core, and the more you lean forward, the easier this pose becomes. Avoid shrugging the shoulders towards the ears and keep the shoulders pulling down towards the hips. 
 
Modifications: 
 
Many people can experience a fear of falling. If you are unable to come into the full posture you can train by lifting one leg off the ground at a time, replacing it, then lifting the other foot. Eventually you will build enough strength to lift both feet. Feel free to also used your feet on blocks to get the sense of lift or take the pose reclined to practice building the core and feeling the crow shape (pictured below).
 
Next level:
 
If crow is easy for you, practice removing one knee at a time towards your heart center so that your knee is hovering at your chest. Eventually, you will do this with both knees simultaneously pulling towards the heart and center eventually straightening both arms into a handstand. You can also try the baby crow variation on your forearms (pictured below).
 
Benefits:
 
*Core strength.
*Improves forearm, wrist and shoulder strength.
*Strengthens inner thigh muscles. 
*Stretches groin.
*Improves balance.
*The rounding of the back stretches the upper back and shoulder muscles. 
 
Namsate and Caw-Caw!
 
Faysal and the peacebank family

 Upside-Down Crow

Upside-Down Crow

 Crow, Feet Supported

Crow, Feet Supported

Crow_4.jpg
 Baby Crow

Baby Crow

 

January 27, 2018

 Handstand

Handstand

Handstand
“Adho Mukha Vrksasana"


"The tragedy of life is not death but what we let die inside of us while we live."   ~ Norman Cousins
 

Hello Challengers, 
 
We invite you this morning to first take a moment to sit with yourself. Imagine yourself living as the best version of your life. 
 
After this, examine yourself now. What do you look like? Where are you? What are you doing? Who are you with? What work are you doing in the world to nourish your soul? What do you feel your purpose is in life? 
 
We have already created important and creative aspects of our life. We can look at what we have become and feel the accomplishments we have made due to our efforts. On the other hand, there are other aspects of the self that still need growth because growing is a part of living. In this case, sometimes through experiencing hardships, obligations and unexpected events we end up in a place we do not necessarily desire to be. Instead of growing past challenges, we become stagnant longer than we would like. Before we know it, months, years and possibly a lifetime can pass us by before we realize we aren't living the best version of our self. 
 
Take this as a moment to evaluate your life and see what areas you have the power to change and overcome patterns through daring to face your challenges. Do something today that allows you to see how strong you are. By setting little intentions and commitments we start to be the change we want to see.
 
When I set an intention and made a commitment to learn how to handstand, I had to come into alignment with a greater part of myself and allow for the continuous challenge of facing fear, doubt, insecurity, mental and physical blocks. What's interesting is after achieving a handstand (years later) I realized the stories and excuses I was telling were not true. All of the fears and mental blocks, for me, were a way of my mind telling a story and creating a projection that wasn't real or true. The overcoming of this fear unlocked stuck patterns of "I can't" and allowed me to become a stronger version of my self. 
 
Before beginning, clear the area around you and have an exit strategy of which direction you are going to fall out of your handstand if need be. If you feel safer kicking up to a wall, please do so. 

Warm up the wrists before starting. If you're uncomfortable kicking up into handstand you can prep yourself by holding plank pose for 60 seconds. 
 
1. Start in Downward dog.
2. Adjust your position by tucking your tailbone (posterior pelvic tilt) and engaging the muscles in your shoulders by drawing your shoulder blades down the back towards the hips.
3. Engage your core muscles and maintain the posterior pelvic tilt.
4. Hands should be shoulder distance apart, fingers spread wide and arms straight.
5.  Fingers should be actively pressing into the ground.
6. Bring one leg up into the air, bending the other knee. 
7. Fix your gaze between or slightly in front of your hands. 
8. With the force of momentum, push off the bent leg and begin to balance on your hands. It's easier to find your balance with the legs still wide in an "L" like position, then to bring the kicking leg up to meet the lifted leg.
9. Aim to stay in the pose 5 breaths, gradually increasing as you gain more confidence, strength and balance.
10. Come down by bringing one leg down at a time. 
 
Benefits: 
Increases arm, shoulder, wrist and core strength.
Trains for better balance.
Improves circulation.
Boosts mood:)
Regulates metabolism by stimulating the endocrine system. 
Improves digestion by stimulating the small and large intestine.
Aids in detoxification. 

Some great modifications include kicking up to a wall, and L shape with feet on the wall, plank, Downward Dog, and/or Legs up the wall. 
 
Whether your intention is to handstand or anything else, pursue that with all of your heart even though you can be sure fear will be a test of your mental and physical strength. Let your actions of living the life you want be greater than your fear! The best version of yourself is not only possible, it is here, already within you.
 
Have fun playing!
Faysal and the peacebank family

 

 Plank

Plank

 Prep for handstand

Prep for handstand

 Something to inspire!

Something to inspire!

January 28, 2018

 Pincha Mayurasana

Pincha Mayurasana

Forearm Balance, Feathered Peacock
“Pincha Mayurasana"


When asked what surprised him about humanity the most, the Dalai Lama replied:
“Man. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.”

 

Happy Sunday Challengers, 
 
I have always been the type of person that needed financial security to feel safe in the world. I would work long hours and justify this to myself by saying I am earning money today to put away for a rainy day. The dollar was my god. I had neglected my personal well being all in the name of money.  
 
As my physical health and mental wellness began to deteriorate because of my actions, I had to look at where I placed value in my life.   I decided to work less, begin therapy and address my underlying emotional fear of feeling safe and supported in the world. The result was a better work/life balance where I was able to address the many aspects of myself that needed my attention: emotional, physical and mental. I was nurturing the different parts of my entire being and not just the part that feared not having enough money. 
 
Don't get me wrong, we live in a capitalist society and we all need to survive by earning an income, but ask yourself, how much is enough? Will it ever be enough? Begin to take care of yourself while you still have a self to take care of. 
 
Find a quiet place and make a list of what is important and of value in your life. After that is complete, can you begin to live your life according to what you value?
 
One of the things I value is a good challenge, and Pincha Mayurasana is just that! If Pincha isn't in your practice, you can build strength by holding forearm plank or dolphin pose, both also very challenging.
 
Please make sure your surrounding area is clear and have an exit plan before attempting to kick up into this pose. You have the option of using the wall to balance.
 
Helpful Props:  If new to this pose you may have trouble setting up a strong bass.  To ensure proper alignment, place a block against the wall and place the inside of the thumbs and index fingers square against the edges of the block.  Place a strap around the arms above the elbows to prevent the elbows from splaying out once you come into the pose. 
 
1. Come into table pose.  If you are using the wall, place your fingertips a few inches away from the wall.  
2. Come down onto your elbows, making sure your elbows are shoulder-width apart, with your forearms pressing into the floor.
3. Press through the hands firmly into the ground, especially through the thumb and index finger.
4. Extend the legs and lift the torso coming into Dolphin Pose. Squeeze the arms towards each other and take your gaze between your hands.
5. Press through the forearms, lifting through the chest and engaging the pelvic floor. Hug the naval towards the spine.
6. Lift one leg high in the air and kick off lightly with the other foot, bringing both legs overhead and resting heels on the wall for support if you like.
7. Avoid poking the ribs out by extending through the torso and pressing the hands and arms firmly on the ground. Keep the core engaged by squeezing the inner thighs together.  
8. Maintain as long as you feel comfortable, remembering to breathe.
9. To exit the pose bring one leg down, then the other.
10. Come into child's pose for few breaths afterwards to allow the body to recuperate.
 
Benefits:
Strengthens the shoulders and arms.
Trains balance
Improves circulation
Stimulates the heart
 
Modifications:
Dolphin
Dolphin plank

Have a meaningful day!
Faysal and the peacebank family

 Dolphin Pose

Dolphin Pose

 Forearm Plank

Forearm Plank

 

January 29, 2018

 Urdhva Dhanurasana

Urdhva Dhanurasana

Full Wheel/Upward Bow
“Urdhva Dhanurasana"


"The only thing you sometimes have control over is perspective. You don't have control over your situation. But you have a choice about how you view it. " ~ Chris Pine
 

Hello Challengers, 

Life is about experiences. The more experiences we cultivate, the more we can learn from life. If we gain reflection and see that an event changed our perspective for the better, the more we are expanding, evolving and growing.

About two years ago I got into a bad car accident while I was a Police Officer. It felt like my world came crashing down around me. I suffered numerous injuries including a traumatic brain injury. My normal ability to function in the world was physically and mentally impacted. I created stories in my mind, judgments, all of which didn't serve me during my hardship. If anything, the negative self talk likely impeded my ability to heal. It took a long time to be at peace with the incident and accept there was a different calling for my life than a lifelong career in law enforcement.

Fast forward to today: although I'm far from a full recovery from the accident, I'm grateful. I couldn't be more thankful that I'm teaching yoga again, surrounded by wonderful people at peacebank and that I made it out of my accident alive! The quote above reminds me that I'm in charge of my life. I'm definitely not in charge of what happens, but I'm responsible for my reaction and how I formulate my perspective. 

We have used inversions to help us flip our perspective, and can also use full wheel to do the same. If full wheel isn't in your practice, please open your heart through bridge pose or restorative bridge on a block. Before beginning, make sure your body, specifically your wrists, shoulders and spine are warmed up prior to attempting this pose.
 
1. Lie on your back on the floor.
2. Bend the knees and bring the heels close to the buttocks.
3. Bring the palms to the floor just above the shoulders with the tips of the fingers pointing towards the shoulders. 
4. Engage the lower body by rooting through the inner balls of your feet, engaging the inner thighs by slightly squeezing the legs together, and engaging the belly toward your spine
5. Inhale and on an exhale, press strongly through the hands and feet, lifting the torso and hips off the floor and bringing the back into an arch/bow shape.
6. Push through the arms as if trying to pull the heart through the arms. Your arms should eventually be straight. 
7. Relax the neck completely.
8. Remember to breathe! Don't hold your breath. 
To come out of the pose tuck your chin to your chest, bend your arms, slowly begin to lower the back of the head, tops of the shoulders and spine to the ground.  

Benefits:
-Strengthens the inner thighs, quadriceps, hamstrings, shoulders and arm muscles.  
-Improves Thoracic Spine flexibility. 
-Opens Chest
-Improves circulation.
-Stimulates thyroid and pituitary gland.
-Can relieve symptoms of mild depression. 

I hope your life is peaceful and healthy. However, if an event comes your way that challenges you, maybe ask yourself if the perspective you hold can help you grow. Some say, “perspective is everything,” but that’s just one perspective. 

Have an incredible week!
Faysal and the peacebank family

 Urdhva Dhanurasana

Urdhva Dhanurasana

 

January 30, 2018

 Savasana

Savasana

Corpse Pose
“Savasana"

Joy For No Reason
"I am filled with quiet joy for no reason save the fact that I’m alive.  The message I received is clear—there’s no time to lose from loving, no place but here to offer kindness, no day but this to be my true, unfettered self and pass the flame from heart to heart.  This is the only moment that exists – so simple, so exquisite, and so real. "
~ Danna Faulds

 

You have made it!!!!!!!
Congratulations for completing this incredible journey inward. We always like to close with savasana as all our hard work leads us here. All of the physical challenges, the mental mountains we have climbed, and the emotional walls we have broken through allow us to bask in the ease, peace, and joy we have worked to cultivate and create space for.
 

When I first began my yoga practice, savasana was a necessary evil. I had this amazing physical and mental release all through the practice and we would get to savasana and I would fall back into my patterns of monkey mind chatter. I would be planning dinner or my meetings for the day, my to do list, anything my mind could get a hold of…and I would let it travel wherever it wanted to go. Needless to say all the space I just created through meditative motion was filled right back up with nonsense. About a year into my practice I took a class that did not end with savasana, and I was heartbroken. I walked out of class upset, angry, revved up, and wondering how you can end a yoga class without the most important pose!!!! I then realized I was robbing myself of the importance of savasana even when it was offered. From that point on I made an intention to really create space for this very important Yoga pose. I used a simple mantra of Let Go and found my first few moments of quiet, of bliss. Overtime and understanding of what Yoga truly is, it has become my most cherished and important moments of the day and led me a few years later to develop a meditation practice, which I now do not know what I would do without.
 

We hope that Savasana clears out some of the places where you hold on, and creates space for JOY, EASE, and a sense of PEACE.

Come to your back allowing your legs to travel long with feet at least hip distance apart with the feet opening out. Arms are along side the body with space for your underarm and palms turned up. Release heavy into your entire being and relax the brow, the muscles of the jaw, and the breath. Invite the physical release to lead to the mental release and the emotional release. Letting space, ease, quiet, and the chance to settle into yourself for a few moments be the gift of BLISS you give to yourself today.
 
Benefits:
~ Calms the brain and helps relieve stress and mild depression
~ Relaxes the body
~ Reduces headache, fatigue, and insomnia
~ Helps to lower blood pressure

Variations can include a bolster under the knees (right above the knees so the heels are still grounded), a sandbag on the forehead (with the help of a block above the head), and/or two sandbags on the thighs to help ground and slightly externally rotate the thighs. Side lying savasana is great for expecting mothers.

Have a blissful day!
Emily and the peacebank family

Special $108 unlimited monthly to all our amazing challenge participants!! 


January has been an incredible journey of love, growth, community and participation. We would love to continue this energy by offering all
challenge participants a special monthly unlimited rate of $108, a sacred number in the practice of yoga. It is our way of thanking you and an incentive for you to continue participating in our classes and events through this year. 

Terms & conditions: 

~ Package activates on the 1st of February and deactivates on the 31st of December 2018

. It is available in the studio only. 

~ This offer can not be pro rated, transferred or placed on hold. 

~ You may cancel at any time with a two week written notice. If you cancel prior to December 31, you will not be offered this rate again.

~ This offer expires on February 7th!
So contact the studio today so you don’t miss out!